korubridge logo c

Te Kete Marama - Weaving the Basket of Light

Mauri Ora
Mauri Ora
Hineahuone
Hineahuone
Hinetitama
Hinetitama
Whiro
Whiro
Rauamoko
Ruaumoko
Tawhirimatea
Tawhirimatea
Whaitiri
Whaitiri
Tane Mahuta
Tane Mahuta
Haumietiketike
Haumietiketike
Tangaroa
Tangaroa
Rehua
Rehua
Hinenuitepo
Hinenuitepo
Maui
Maui
Taniwha
Taniwha
Te whanau marama
Te Whanau Marama
Kete Aronui
Kete Aronui
Kete Tuauri
Kete Tuauri
Kete Tuatea
Kete Tuatea
Ra
Te Ra
Marama
Te Marama

He Tamariki - Hine-nui-te-po’s Journey

These works began as an exploration of Io Matua Kore, the ancient Māori spiritual teachings and their relationship to Jungian concepts.

On the surface the stories with which we have grown up seem naive attempts to explain the Creation and the natural world. However they are in fact archetypal and the atua (gods), the children (tamariki) of Ranginui and Papatuanuku are symbolic, characters who refer to the forces which operate upon us and lead us to do the things we do.

Thus the stories contain wisdom, profound understandings and astute observations of the human journey. There are remarkable similarities between this and other indigenous traditions. These works attempt to draw some of these parallels, to show that ultimately all paths are one.

“To seek one’s own salvation and then not use it to benefit others is extreme selfishness. But to seek salvation for oneself so that ultimate freedom may be shared with others is divine.”
~Paramahansa Yogananda

A chance meeting more than twenty-three years ago enabled me to take the first step onto this path. In an afternoon I was taught something of Io Matua Kore, the ancient Māori spiritual tradition and some of the understandings contained within it. I learned how each of the tamariki, children of Ranginui (Father Sky) and Papatuanuku (Mother Earth), are in fact archetypal, metaphors for aspects of the human journey, guardians waiting to help us cross the ravines and rivers we will meet on our path.

It would be another 18 years before I met my matua (teacher) again.

One day the phone went. "I think you need to hear the rest of the story", he said. It was my matua-to-be, Te Hata. For the last few years, we have walked the road together, as he has guided me and expanded my understanding.

The task of the visual artist is to represent, to use his gifts to add to the sum of human experience and knowledge, to bring the wonder of the inner world into concrete form. It is a sacred responsibility.

Over time, as each of them reveals himself or herself to me and asks to be given form, I assist in helping them to move forward into the Light, to be of service as they will.

And because their number is great, I have no sense of a destination, only a journey.

There are now 72 cards and they have their own website:

Māori Creation Mythology

Ranginui and Papatuanuku "are the primordial parents, the sky father and the earth mother who lie locked together in a tight embrace. They have many children ... who are forced to live in the cramped darkness between them. These children grow and discuss among themselves what it would be like to live in the light. Tūmatauenga, the fiercest of the children, proposes that the best solution to their predicament is to kill their parents."

"But his brother, Tāne-mahuta, disagrees, suggesting that it is better to push them apart, to let Rangi [Father Sky] be as a stranger to them in the sky above while Papa [Mother Earth] will remain below to nurture them. ... After many attempts [by the other brothers] Tāne, god of forests and birds, forces his parents apart."

"Instead of standing upright and pushing with his hands as his brothers have done, he lies on his back and pushes with his strong legs. Stretching every sinew Tāne pushes and pushes until, with cries of grief and surprise, Ranginui and Papatuanuku were pried apart."